Link feast

8aaaa-linkfeastOur editor’s pick the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so:

How To Talk So That People Listen
At the recent Latitude Festival Psychologist magazine editor Jon Sutton was in conversation with Elizabeth Stokoe, Professor of Social Interaction at Loughborough University – follow the link for a transcript of the event (a related podcast will be available soon).

The Brain That Couldn’t Remember
The untold story of the fight over the legacy of “H.M.” — the patient who revolutionized the science of memory.

Why We Should Pity Attention-seeking Narcissists
There are some surprising and unpleasant downsides to thinking you are the centre of the universe.

When Will Neuroscience Blow Our Minds?
The discipline has promised big advances in many areas, but is it failing to live up to the hype? Three neuroscientists consider the state of their field.

The Stroop Test: How Colourful Is Your Language?
The first article in a new series on classic psychology experiments, from the Guardian‘s Head Quarters blog.

A Manifesto Against Parenting
Caring for children shouldn’t be like carpentry, with a finished product in mind. We should grow our children, like gardeners.

Peter Pan and Wendy: How J M Barrie Understood and Demonstrated Keys Aspects of Cognition
“Barrie had an almost uncanny grasp of human cognitive development four to eight decades before psychologists began to work on similar questions about the way we develop thinking and reasoning skills.”

Was Freud Right About Dreams After All? Here’s The Research That Helps Explain It
“Over the past decade or so, a new series of experiments have begun to demonstrate that at least one part of Freud’s theory might have been correct after all: that we dream of things we are trying our best to ignore.”

What Makes People Feel Upbeat At Work?
How can an employer create an upbeat workplace? By not telling people to be positive.

Am I Just Paranoid? You Asked Google – Here’s The Answer
Psychologist Daniel Freeman answers one of the most common questions posed to the Google search engine.

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Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

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