Category: Competitions

5 chances to win a cutting edge occupational psychology textbook

update: this competition is now closed and the winners have been contacted. Thanks for your entries. We have five copies to give away of Occupational Psychology: An Applied Approach by Gail Steptoe-Warren, kindly donated to us by the publishers Pearson.

From the publishers: “Occupational Psychology: An Applied Approach introduces students to the essential theories in this area, from motivation and wellbeing to group roles and individual differences. The book explores the impact of every topic from the perspective of the individual, management, and the organisation as a whole, encouraging the reader to consider the consultancy process at each stage.”

For your chance to win the book, simply post a brief answer to this question set by Pearson – “How do you think an occupational psychologist can have the most impact on a workplace?” Five winners will be picked at close of play on Friday 26 April. Please remember to leave an email address for us to contact you.

For inspiration, remember you can read about new occupational psychology research here on the main Research Digest and over at our sibling blog the Occupational Digest. Good luck.

5 chances to win The Face of Emotion: How Botox Affects Our Moods & Relationships

This competition is now closed and the winners have been contacted. Many thanks to everyone who entered. We have five copies to give away of The Face of Emotion How Botox Affects Our Moods and Relationships by Eric Finzi, kindly donated to the Digest by Palgrave Macmillan. New Scientist called the book “a provocative and insightful contribution” to the debate about emotional regulation.

From the publishers: “William Shakespeare famously wrote that ‘a face is like a book,’ and common wisdom has it that our faces reveal our deep-seated emotions. But what if the reverse were also true? What if our facial expressions set our moods instead of revealing them? What if there were actual science to support the exhortation, “smile, be happy?” Dermatologic surgeon Eric Finzi has been studying that question for nearly two decades, and in this ground breaking book he marshals evidence suggesting that our facial expressions are not secondary to, but rather a central driving force of, our emotions.”

For your chance to win a copy, simply tell us what you’d say to a friend or colleague to convince them that they should read the BPS Research Digest. The writers of our five favourite answers will each receive a copy of the book. The competition closes Friday evening. Please leave an email address (or weblink) for us to contact you. Good luck!

5 chances to win The Myth of Martyrdom

This competition is now closed and the winners contacted. We have five copies to give away of The Myth of Martyrdom What Really Drives Suicide Bombers, Rampage Shooters, and Other Self-Destructive Killers by Adam Lankford, kindly donated to us by Palgrave Macmillan.

From the publishers: “Drawing on an array of primary sources, including suicide notes, love letters, diary entries, and martyrdom videos, Lankford reveals the important parallels that exist between suicide bombers, airplane hijackers, cult members, and rampage shooters. The result is an astonishing account of rage and shame that will transform the way we think of terrorism forever.” (Check out this review from Scientific American Mind).

For your chance to win a copy, simply post a comment to this blog entry telling us which was your favourite Research Digest blog item of 2012 and why (there’s a drop-down archive menu in the right-hand column). We’ll pick five winners at close of play on Friday. Please leave a way for us to contact you by email. Good luck!
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5 chances to win Total Addiction The Life of an Eclipse Chaser

This competition is now closed and the winners contacted – thanks for your entries. We have five copies to give away of Total Addiction The Life of an Eclipse Chaser, by Kate Russo. Here’s a teaser from the news pages of The Psychologist magazine

“For a few eerie minutes on Wednesday14 November local time, just after sunrise, people living in Northern Australia will be shrouded in darkness as the Moon falls into perfect alignment with the Sun.

One person who will be returning to her homeland to witness this total eclipse is the Chartered Psychologist Kate Russo, of Queens University Belfast. Since 1999, when she experienced her first total eclipse, Russo has become hooked. Like other ‘eclipse chasers’, Russo travels the world in search of these darkest of shadows. November’s experience will be her eighth total eclipse.

Recently Russo has applied her professional skills to her hobby, in search of an answer to why total eclipses have such a profound, awe-inspiring effect on some people. ‘There is a recognition that the experience is significant, although it is difficult to make sense of, and difficult to communicate to others,’ says Russo. ‘We feel we are at the edge of our language abilities. We come to understand that this cannot be a one-off event. We are hooked. Another eclipse chaser is born.’”

For your chance to win a copy of Total Addiction, simply post a comment to this blog entry telling us what you do to experience awe in your life. Winners will be picked at random at the end of the week. Please leave a way for us to contact you.

Five chances to win a copy of The Rough Guide to Psychology

Thanks for all your interesting entries. This competition is now closed and the winners have been contacted.

To celebrate worldwide sales in excess of 10,000 copies, Rough Guides have kindly donated to us 5 copies of The Rough Guide to Psychology by Digest editor Christian Jarrett. From the reviews:

Professor Uta Frith DBE said the The Rough Guide is “disarmingly appealing to the deep desire to know ourselves” and presents “psychology today in a nutshell”. Prof Robert Epstein said “It is accurate, up-to-date and easy to read … For a rough guide, this book is smooth.” And psychologist, teacher and Guardian blogger Marc Smith said it’s perhaps “the best introduction to the subject I have seen.”

For your chance to win a copy, simply post a brief comment to this blog entry before Friday evening, saying what you think the next big breakthrough in psychology will be. We will identify the five winners by choosing our favourite answers from the comments (please remember to leave an email address for us to reach you). 

Five chances to win a copy of Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain

This competition is now closed and the five winners have been contacted. Thank you for all your entries. 

We’ve got five copies to give away of Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain by Professor Elaine Fox, kindly provided to us by William Heinemann. Here’s what the publishers say about the book: 

Are you optimistic or pessimistic? Glass half-full or half-empty? Do you look on the bright side or turn towards the dark? These are easy questions for most of us to answer, because our personality types are hard-wired into our brains. As pioneering psychologist and neuroscientist Elaine Fox has discovered, our outlook on life reflects our primal inclination to seek pleasure or avoid danger-inclinations that, in many people, are healthily balanced. But when our ‘fear brain’ or ‘pleasure brain’ is too strong, the results can be disastrous, as those of us suffering from debilitating shyness, addiction, depression, or anxiety know all too well.

Drawing on her own cutting-edge research, Fox shows how we can retrain our brains to brighten our lives and learn to flourish. With keen insights into how genes, life experiences and cognitive processes interleave together to make us who we are, Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain revolutionises our basic concept of individuality. We learn that we can influence our own personalities, and that our lives are only as ‘sunny’ or as ‘rainy’ as we allow them to be.

For a chance to win a copy, please post a comment to this blog entry telling us why you’re optimistic about the future (please leave an email address). We’ll pick five winners at random next Friday. Good luck!

Two chances to win "Social Psychology – Revisiting the Classic Studies"

Thanks for all your entries. This competition is now closed and the winners have been contacted.

We’ve got two copies to give away of Social Psychology – Revisiting the Classic Studies, kindly provided to us by Sage. Here’s what they say about the new book:

“The field of social psychology is defined by a number of ‘classic studies’ that all students need to understand and engage with. These include ground-breaking experiments by researchers such as Asch, Festinger, Milgram, Sherif, Tajfel and Zimbardo. With the help of international experts who are renowned for work that has extended upon these researchers’ insights, this book re-examines these classic studies through careful reflection on their findings and a lively discussion of the subsequent work that they have inspired.”

For your chance to win a copy, simply post a comment to this blog post, telling us which is your favourite classic social psychology experiment and why. We’ll pick two winners at random on Friday. Please make sure you include an email address for us to contact you. Good luck!

5 chances to win a copy of The Shrink And The Sage

This competition is now closed and the winners have been contacted.

We have 5 copies of The Shrink and The Sage by Julian Baggini and Antonia Macaro to give away. From the publishers: 

Philosopher Julian Baggini and therapist Antonia Macaro present their unique brand of self-help – with a distinctly cerebral edge. From what Aristotle can teach us about practical wisdom to how the work of psychologists such as Daniel Kahneman can improve our decision-making, they offer eminently practical advice to many common personal dilemmas. What does philosophical logic have to say about sticking to resolutions? How important is work? Could Danish existentialist Søren Kierkegaard lead you to a more satisfying life? Upbeat, enjoyable and thought-provoking, this brilliantly readable intellectual agony uncle and aunt team combine the insights of philosophy and psychology to begin to piece together a a guide to the good life and how to live it. 

For your chance to win a copy, simply post a comment to this blog entry stating who your favourite philosopher is and why. The 5 winners will be chosen at random on Friday (please ensure you leave an email address).

5 chances to win a copy of Rethinking Madness

This competition is now closed and the winners have been contacted.

We have 5 copies of Rethinking Madness by psychologist Paris Williams to give away. From the publishers:

“In Rethinking Madness, Dr. Paris Williams takes the reader step by step on a highly engaging journey of discovery, exploring how the mainstream understanding of schizophrenia has become so profoundly misguided, while crafting a much more accurate and hopeful vision of madness. As this vision unfolds, we discover a deeper sense of appreciation for the profound wisdom and resilience that lies within our beings while also coming to the unsettling realization of just how thin the boundary is between so called madness and so called sanity.”

For your chance to win a copy, simply post a comment to this blog entry stating why this is a topic that interests you. The winners will be chosen at random on Friday (make sure you leave an email address).

Win a BPS-approved textbook on language development

This competition is now closed and the two winners have been contacted. The correct answer was 1978 (the paradigm was first presented in 75, but first published in a journal article in 78).

We’ve got two copies of Language Development to give away, kindly donated to us by Wiley-Blackwell.

For your chance to win, either tweet or add a comment to this post, saying who developed the Still Face paradigm and when it was first published.

If you tweet your answer, make sure you mention @researchdigest and use the hashtag #langdevcomp

If you post your answer as a comment to this blog post, make sure you leave a way for us to contact you.

At the end of the week, we’ll pick at random one correct answer from all entries on Twitter and one correct answer from the comments section of this blog post*.

Good luck!

*Digest Facebook followers can also enter the competition by commenting on the Digest Facebook page – for the purposes of choosing a winner, their entries will be included alongside the blog comments