Category: Feast

Link feast

screen-shot-2016-09-09-at-18-20-33Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

There’s Such a Thing as Too Much Neuroscience
NYT Op-ed by John Markowitz.

Maybe Trump Is Explained by His Disastrous Sleep Habits
“Trump Syndrome”: “a ravenous late-night craving for stimulation that results in a sometimes sporadic, often slender sleep schedule,” explains Drake Baer at New York’s Science of Us.

‘Rubber Hand illusion’ Reveals How The Brain Understands The Body
Scientists use a trick with a fake hand to explore how the mind combines information from the senses to create a feeling of body ownership. Ian Sample at The Guardian.

Continue reading “Link feast”

Link feast

screen-shot-2016-09-09-at-18-20-33Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

The Everyday Magic of Superstition
Ella Rhodes at The Psychologist speaks to psychologists in an attempt to understand the widespread and persistent nature of apparently irrational beliefs.

Do Men and Women Really Have Different Personalities?
Personality profiles appear to reveal consistent (if subtle) differences between men and women – but are they meaningful? I attempted to untangle a knotty and controversial question for BBC Future.

Continue reading “Link feast”

Link feast

screen-shot-2016-09-09-at-18-20-33Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links

‘Honey, I Shrunk The Kids’
At The Psychologist, Jon Sutton and Aidan Horner speak to the children of psychologists, and the psychologists themselves, about their parenting.

Why Does the Replication Crisis Seem Worse in Psychology?
The same problems are facing other fields, too. Here’s why you hear about it most in psychology, says Andrew Gelman for Slate. Continue reading “Link feast”

Link feast

screen-shot-2016-09-09-at-18-20-33Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

How Curiosity Can Protect The Mind From Bias
Neither intelligence nor education can stop you from forming prejudiced opinions – but an inquisitive attitude may help you make wiser judgements

There’s a Lot of Junk fMRI Research Out There. Here’s What Top Neuroscientists Want You to Know
It’s easy to misrepresent the findings from brain scan studies. Just ask a dead salmon.

Live Long and Prosper
The psychology of Star Trek’s relentless optimism about the future.

Why Are Babies So Dumb If Humans Are So Smart?
Human intelligence comes with a curious caveat: our babies are among the dumbest—or, rather, the most helpless—that exist.

The 8 New Books To Read This Autumn/Winter
Occupational psychologist and best-selling author Adam Grant spent his summer reading advance copies of the top-releases on the way later this year. Here are his favourite 8.

How to Raise a Genius: Lessons From a 45-Year Study of Super-smart Children
A long-running investigation of exceptional children reveals what it takes to produce the scientists who will lead the twenty-first century.

Clues To Your Personality Appeared Before You Could Talk
Long before you could express yourself with words, you were giving away the signs of your adult temperament. I explain how over at my BBC column.

Brain drain? Lumosity Reels After Federal Crackdown on Online ‘Brain Training’
The brain-training giant Lumosity is recalibrating its strategy and facing new challenges as it reels from a federal crackdown on bold health claims about its digital games.

The Language Rules We Know – But Don’t Know We Know
Mark Forsyth tasted internet fame this week when a passage from a book he wrote went viral. He explains more language secrets that native speakers know without knowing.

Discover the Science of School Yard Illusions
Childhood tricks can reveal a surprising amount about early cognition and the nervous system.

–Compiled by Christian Jarrett, Editor of BPS Research Digest

Link feast

8aaaa-linkfeastOur editor’s pick of the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so: 

Why We should Celebrate Shyness
From Agatha Christie and Charles Darwin to Keira Knightley, Francoise Hardy and Morrissey, the socially awkward and anxious have changed the world for the better. Have we forgotten the benefits of being shy?

How to Talk to Strangers
The health benefits are clear. The political benefits are newly relevant

Worldwide initiatives to advance brain research
To highlight worldwide efforts to fund neuroscience research and address the growing threat of brain disorders, Nature Neuroscience asked leaders of six global brain initiatives to write about their programs.

Continue reading “Link feast”

Link feast

8aaaa-linkfeastOur editor’s pick of the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so:

Secrets of Super Siblings
Nine families raised children who all went on to extraordinary success. Here’s what they have in common.

‘When Life Hands You a Lemon, Just Bite In’
Judith Rich Harris takes Lance Workman at The Psychologist through her extraordinary fightback against entrenched views of child development.

The Beautiful Yet Twisted History of Psychological Testing
The early 20th century saw a boom in experimental and beautiful, but ultimately fraught, diagnostic tests. A new book entitled Psychobook compiles them in a gorgeous collection and is available next month.

Why Do Children Lie?
In this BBC Radio 4 documentary, psychotherapist Philippa Perry delves into the world of childhood deception to discover when and why children lie. Philippa speaks to author Ian Leslie who believes that a child’s first lie is a cause for celebration.

Continue reading “Link feast”

Link feast

8aaaa-linkfeastOur editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

What On Earth Is Going On?
Psychologist magazine editor Dr Jon Sutton reports from the first day of the American Psychological Association’s Annual Conference (also check out his reports from days two and three: In search of clarity and creativity; A change is gonna come).

“What Is Happening to Our Country? How Psychology Can Respond to Political Polarization, Incivility and Intolerance”
Jonathan Haidt’s keynote address at the APA conference is available to watch on YouTube.

Faculty at MIT and beyond respond forcefully to an article critical of Suzanne Corkin
More than 200 members of the scientific community sign a letter supporting the late MIT neuroscientist; department head issues a statement.
Supporters rally to protect the late Professor Corkin’s reputation following the controversial New York Times magazine article by Luke Dittrich that we featured in Link feast last week.

Questions & Answers about “Patient H.M.”
Luke Dittrich responds to the MIT statement.

The Danger of Making a Backup Plan
Knowing you have a safety net makes you less likely to make the leap. My take on some new research for 99U.com.

I am Maria Konnikova, a contributing writer for The New Yorker. I cover the world of psychology—and beyond
The author and columnist took questions in a Reddit AMA (ask me anything).

Only The Lonely
“Loneliness is hell: debilitating yet formative,” writes Cody Delistraty at Aeon. “Can we avoid the pains of loneliness yet enjoy the pleasures of solitude?”

Six Strategies for Effective Learning 
Downloadable posters from the Learning Scientists (three psychologists on a mission to make research on learning more accessible to students, teachers, and other educators).

We Are Not The Only Species To Develop Speech Impediments
Birds that stutter and mice that make ultrasonic squeaks could help reveal the origins of spoken language. By Mo Costandi for BBC Earth.

Big assumptions, poor data: this time James Flynn won’t change your ideas about IQ
Stuart Ritchie for The Spectator reviews the new book from James Flynn, best known for documenting the rise in average IQs.

Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Link feast

8aaaa-linkfeastOur editor’s pick the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so:

How To Talk So That People Listen
At the recent Latitude Festival Psychologist magazine editor Jon Sutton was in conversation with Elizabeth Stokoe, Professor of Social Interaction at Loughborough University – follow the link for a transcript of the event (a related podcast will be available soon).

The Brain That Couldn’t Remember
The untold story of the fight over the legacy of “H.M.” — the patient who revolutionized the science of memory.

Why We Should Pity Attention-seeking Narcissists
There are some surprising and unpleasant downsides to thinking you are the centre of the universe.

When Will Neuroscience Blow Our Minds?
The discipline has promised big advances in many areas, but is it failing to live up to the hype? Three neuroscientists consider the state of their field.

The Stroop Test: How Colourful Is Your Language?
The first article in a new series on classic psychology experiments, from the Guardian‘s Head Quarters blog.

A Manifesto Against Parenting
Caring for children shouldn’t be like carpentry, with a finished product in mind. We should grow our children, like gardeners.

Peter Pan and Wendy: How J M Barrie Understood and Demonstrated Keys Aspects of Cognition
“Barrie had an almost uncanny grasp of human cognitive development four to eight decades before psychologists began to work on similar questions about the way we develop thinking and reasoning skills.”

Was Freud Right About Dreams After All? Here’s The Research That Helps Explain It
“Over the past decade or so, a new series of experiments have begun to demonstrate that at least one part of Freud’s theory might have been correct after all: that we dream of things we are trying our best to ignore.”

What Makes People Feel Upbeat At Work?
How can an employer create an upbeat workplace? By not telling people to be positive.

Am I Just Paranoid? You Asked Google – Here’s The Answer
Psychologist Daniel Freeman answers one of the most common questions posed to the Google search engine.

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Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so:

The Psychological Tricks Behind Pokemon Go’s Success
Nintendo’s latest video game has become an overnight sensation. What’s the appeal?

Split Second Responses?
At The Psychologist magazine, Peter Squires, Professor of Criminology and Public Policy at the University of Brighton, considers the research on police and guns, and calls for more psychological enquiry.

Mystery of What Sleep Does to Our Brains May Finally Be Solved
It’s the brain’s equivalent of housekeeping.

The Mystery of Urban Psychosis
Why are paranoia and schizophrenia more common in cities?

The Scientific Reality of the Addictive Personality – Insights From Cocaine-addicted Rats
Evidence from research labs tells us that it is indeed possible to produce rats with what appear to be ‘addictive personalities’ – something that was used in a recently published set of experiments by researchers from the University of Michigan.

Why Small Talk Is So Excruciating
To “talk well” in the social sense, to be adept at sending the correct social signals, is a different skill than “talking well” in the communicative sense.

Unraveling the Mysteries of Personality and Well-Being with Dr. Brian Little
Who am I? Am I just a product of nature and/or nurture? What does it mean to live a life of meaning and happiness? On this episode of The Psychology Podcast, Dr. Brian Little helps us explore these existentially significant questions.

Why You Don’t Know Your Own Mind
It is assumed that your experience of your own consciousness clinches the assertion that you “know your own mind” in a way that no one else can. This is a mistake.

Human Brain Mapped in Unprecedented Detail
Nearly 100 previously unidentified brain areas revealed by examination of the cerebral cortex.

The Many Ways to Map the Brain
It takes both science and art to make sense of the organ’s complexities.

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Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

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Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

This Is Your Brain on Silence
Contrary to popular belief, peace and quiet is all about the noise in your head.

The Most Terrifying Childhood Condition You’ve Never Heard Of
Childhood disintegrative disorder, a rare and severe condition, rapidly melts away a child’s abilities. A new theory proposes that this little-known condition turns back the developmental clock.

States of Mind: The Sky Is Wider (BBC Radio 4 drama developed in consultation with neuroscientist Anil Seth)
When Ella is asked questions pointing her towards places and memories, she begins to realise that the world she lives in now is just the imagined life of her mind and in reality she is in hospital in a minimally conscious state.

Irving Gottesman, Pioneering Psychologist on Schizophrenia, Dies at 85
NY Times Obit.

Can Attachment Theory Explain All Our Relationships?
The most important parenting you’ll ever do happens before your child turns one — and may affect her for the rest of her life. One mother’s journey through the science of attachment.

Review: Jonah Lehrer’s ‘A Book About Love’ Is Another Unoriginal Sin
The pop psychology wunderkind is back.

False-Positive fMRI Hits The Mainstream
Neuroskeptic takes a measured look at a new study that some have claimed invalidates 15 years of fMRI research.

Poignant and Fascinating
Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes for The Psychologist reviews a new Science Museum exhibition: Wounded: Conflict, Casualties and Care.

What Freudian Slips Really Reveal About Your Mind
Do our verbal stumblings unveil our unconscious desires – or are they simply an innocent glitch in the brain’s workings? BBC Future investigates.

The ‘Gay Cure’ Experiments That Were Written Out of Scientific History
Robert Heath claimed to have cured homosexuality by implanting electrodes into the pleasure centre of the brain. Robert Collie at Mosaic reports on one of the great forgotten stories of neuroscience.
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Compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!