Category: Feast

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so:

The Brexit Poll
The Psychologist canvassed psychologically-informed opinion on the EU Referendum result and what happens next.

Who Are You Really? The Puzzle Of Personality
Newly released TED talk by Professor Brian Little.

The Complex Circumstances That Defined Your Gender
Scientists are only just getting to grips with the complicated interplay of genes, hormones and life experience that come to shape our identity (part of a new “sexual revolutions” series from BBC Future).

Why We’re Different
A conversation with pioneering behavioural geneticist Robert Plomin.

Re-reading Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow
Four years on, how does the best-selling book hold up?

The Dangers of Being Too Hard On Yourself
You can easily recognize when one of your friends is being too hard on themselves. But it’s a bit harder to self-diagnose…

Thin Slices of Anxiety: An Illustrated Meditation on What It’s Like to Live Enslaved by Worry and How to Break Free
A guided tour of this pernicious prison of the psyche, assuring in its honesty.

Should Your Driverless Car Hit a Pedestrian to Save Your Life?
The issue of robotic morality has become a serious question for researchers working on autonomous vehicles who must, in essence, program moral decisions into a machine.

On the Reality of Race and the Abhorrence of Racism
Racism isn’t wrong because there aren’t races; it is wrong because it violates basic human decency and modern moral ideals.

“I Saw Things Children Shouldn’t See” – Surviving a Troubled Childhood
Why are some people able to become happy, well-adjusted adults even after growing up with violence or neglect?
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Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

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Link feast

Our editor’s pick of the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so:

“We Are Complicit In Making These Groups All But Invisible”
Martin Milton argues at The Psychologist that LGBT debate needs urgent progression in wake of the Orlando attack.

Jerome S. Bruner, Who Shaped Understanding of the Young Mind, Dies at 100
NYT obit.

Koko: The Gorilla Who Talks To People (on iPlayer)
Documentary telling the extraordinary story of Koko, the only ‘talking’ gorilla in the world, and her lifelong relationship with Penny Patterson, who taught her to communicate.

Psychologists Grow Increasingly Dependent On Online Research Subjects
New studies suggest that volunteer research subjects for Amazon Mechanical Turk—an online crowdsourcing service—are less numerous and diverse than hoped.

VR Video Lets You See The World Through The Eyes Of An Autistic Boy
The virtual reality experience was made using feedback from the autistic community

What Crisis? – The Reproducibility Crisis (video and report)
A huge audience of psychologists, students and researchers was drawn to the British Psychological Society debate in London about the reproducibility and replication crisis in psychology.

Do You Have to Be a Jerk to Be Successful?
Why the pervasive myth of the malcontent genius is harmful to our own creative development.

‘I’d Have Said Let’s Not Do This’: What Osborne Never Asked His Nudge Guru
An interview with Professor Richard Thaler, godfather of behavioural economics.

Why You Can Never Tell What Your Friends Really Think of You
We like to think we can judge how we present ourselves to others – but psychology says we’re wrong.

The Neurosciences Go Mega
An exclusive extract from the new book ‘Can Neuroscience Change Our Minds?’, by Hilary Rose and Steven Rose.

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Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

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Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

Why So Negative?
Ella Rhodes at The Psychologist speaks to psychologists about the ongoing EU referendum campaigns.

Ten Serendipitous Findings in Psychology
Compiled by Dorothy Bishop.

Your Therapist is White. You’re Not. Is This a Problem?
Similar cultural roots don’t guarantee better bond, yet competence in learning about differences and being mindful of verbal and non-verbal cues are critical.

Living With Dementia: Chris’ Story (now available on iPlayer)
A powerful, multi-textured BBC documentary filmed over almost two years following a 55-year-old man and his family as they come to terms with his Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

Suzanne Corkin, Who Helped Pinpoint Nature of Memory, Dies at 79
New York Times obituary.

It’s Curious That We Cry – Here’s What We Know About Why
When you think about it, shedding tears from your eyes is rather strange. Why do we do it? And why might there be differences between men and women?

Night Watch In The Brain: Recent Findings On First-Night-In-New-Place-Insomnia
By Sofia Deleniv on her blog The Neurosphere.

The Women That Kill, Abuse and Torture
We have struggled to comprehend the origins of female violence, painting female serial killers as reluctant sidekicks or psychotic femmes fatales. That needs to change.

Stop Comparing Management To Sport 
“Good management is not like a competitive sport,” writes Freek Vermeulen at the Harvard Business Review. “And managing your company as if it is, can lead your business astray – or at least create a mighty corporate mess.”

The Witness: a Brother’s Quest to Put Kitty Genovese Case to Rest
New York Times review of a new documentary about the murder of Kitty Genovese – a crime that has acquired a mythical stature in psychology. “James Solomon’s seamless documentary, ‘The Witness,’ traces the yearslong efforts of Ms. Genovese’s younger brother Bill, who was close to Kitty, to get to the bottom of what actually happened.”

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Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s best psychology links:

Can a Morning Routine Make You Better At Your Job?
While some people struggle to make it out of bed on time, there are others who manage exercise, language lessons and more – all before work.

Angela Duckworth Responds To A New Critique Of Grit
The University of Pennsylvania psychologist and grit advocate responds to a new meta-analysis that concludes grit is not a useful concept.

The Psychologist Guide to… Leadership
Ella Rhodes speaks to psychologists for evidence-based tips. Sponsored by Goldsmiths Institute of Management Studies.

IQ Can Predict Your Risk of Death, and 8 Other Smart Facts About Intelligence
Nobody wants to be a number. But there is one number that probably says a lot about you, whether you know it or not: your IQ, or intelligence quotient.

Neuromyths With Laura Flores Shaw
The latest episode of the NeuroCurious podcast tackles the 10 per cent myth, the left brain / right brain myth plus much more!

Psychology’s ‘Registration Revolution’
Moves to uphold transparency are not only making psychology more scientific – they are harnessing our knowledge of the mind to strengthen science.

What Your Walk Really Says About You
We often think we can read someone’s personality from their gait – but while many of those assumptions are wrong, your walk may nevertheless reveal the one thing you are trying to hide.

The Empty Brain
Your brain does not process information, retrieve knowledge or store memories. In short: your brain is not a computer, argues Robert Epstein.

Your Words May Predict Your Future Mental Health
In this new TED talk, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reflects on ancient Greece and the origins of introspection to investigate how our words hint at our inner lives and details a word-mapping algorithm that could predict the development of schizophrenia.

How to Use Distraction to Your Advantage
Your scatterbrain is great when it is time to think of new ideas. But when it comes to executing those ideas? Not so much.
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Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links

Anyone Can Give a Memorable TED Talk
Rules from the head of the famed conferences: focus, connect, practice—and have something to say.

The Two Word Games That Trick Almost Everyone
Playing two classic schoolyard games can help us understand everything from sexism to the power of advertising, writes Tom Stafford at his Neurohacks column for BBC Future.

Get Angry!
After listening to a podcast on the psychology of climate change denial, artist Sasha Mirzoyan uses his frustration as inspiration for creating this picture.

Saving Science from The Scientists (BBC Radio documentary)
Alok Jha delves into dodgy data, questionable practices and genuine ambiguity to ask if human decision making is impeding scientific progress, and if anything can be done about it.

Ahhhh, PPNAS!
Stats whiz Andrew Gelman takes aim at a new study in the journal PNAS that claimed air rage incidents are more common on flights with a separate first class section. “I think we have to accept statistical incompetence not as an aberration but as the norm,” he says.

Help the National Museum of Psychology #KickstartHistory
Some of our colleagues across the pond are fund-raising to launch a museum of psychology.

The Encounter
Cognitive neuroscientist Chris Frith reflects on the nature of communication and consciousness. “Communication is not simply about the transfer of information. You can do that with a cash machine.”

How Babies Quickly Learn to Judge Adults
By Susan Pinker for the Wall Street Journal.

Imagine These Experiments in Aphantasia
Aphantasia is the inability to see mental images. “The most striking aspect of this variation in mental life,” writes Neurocritic, is that those of us with imagery assume that everyone else has it, while those without are flabbergasted when they learn that other people can ‘see’ pictures in their head”.

Following The Latest Psychology Research Just Got Really Easy
Introducing the Research Digest App for iOS and Android.

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Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

Leicester’s Lesson In Leadership
A leader is not “the special one”, but “the one who makes us special”, argue S. Alexander Haslam and Stephen D. Reicher at The Psychologist.

The Imposter’s Survival Guide (BBC radio show)
Oliver Burkeman explores the imposter phenomenon. That inexplicable feeling of fraudulence that plagues the working lives of so many people.

Why You Should Never Spank a Child – Major Research Project Confirms Dangers
The Telegraph reports on a new study.

A Drawing of the Drawing Effect Study
Rob Dimeo has drawn the findings of the “drawing effect” study that we reported on recently.

Why So Many Smart People Aren’t Happy
It’s a paradox: Shouldn’t the most accomplished be well equipped to make choices that maximize life satisfaction?

Mind Fu*k Alert: Plants May Have Memories
Gizmodo reports on a surprising new study.

Is Social Media Making People Depressed?
Mark Widdowson (Lecturer in Counselling and Psychotherapy, University of Salford) gives his verdict at The Conversation.

Do Women Make Bolder Leaders Than Men?
“looking through our database of 360-degree assessments from 75,000 leaders around the world, we noticed that on average the women were bolder than the men”.

New Insights Into Body And Mind
A book on psychosomatic illness by Suzanne O’Sullivan has won this year’s prestigious Wellcome Trust Book Prize.

This Is How It Feels To Learn Your Memories Are Fiction
David Robson at BBC Future reports on the confabulation that can occur when brain injuries impair memory.
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Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

Are We Punching Our Weight?
The Psychologist magazine’s Ella Rhodes asks whether psychology is having the desired impact, through the media and policy.

The Trippy State Between Wakefulness and Sleep
And how it can help solve the mystery of human consciousness.

Why The Internet Isn’t Making Us Smarter And How To Fight Back
Advice from psychologist David Dunning.

Weeping Britannia: Portrait of a Nation in Tears
There’s a new book out on the history of crying.

Sorry, You Can’t Speed Read
Two psychologists have reviewed the literature and they conclude: “it’s extremely unlikely you can greatly improve your reading speed without missing out on a lot of meaning.”

Making Brain Waves in Society
Cliodhna O’Connor and Helene Joffe on the “ripple effects” generated as a piece of neuroscience leaves the laboratory.

What Can A Lemon Tell You About Your Personality?
Do you find yourself salivating at the merest thought of eating a lemon? The answer may say more about your mind than your taste for sour flavours (the first article for my new Personology column at BBC Future).

Enzo Yaksic: Profiler 2.0
For decades, the FBI has relied on a flawed criminal profile to identify and catch serial killers. Now a Boston data geek thinks he’s found a better way.

Cadaver Study Casts Doubts on How Zapping Brain May Boost Mood, Relieve Pain
Reporting for Science Magazine, Emily Underwood quotes researcher Vincent Walsh: The tDCS [transcranial direct current stimulation] field is “a sea of bullshit and bad science—and I say that as someone who has contributed some of the papers that have put gas in the tDCS tank”.

Why We Sleep Badly on Our First Night in a New Place
Is it because half our brain is staying up to keep watch?

_________________________________
   
Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

Robert De Niro Defends Anti-Vax Nonsense
“Let’s just find out the truth”. No, Mr. De Niro, we already know the truth about vaccines.

Wellbeing Issues Facing Psychological Professionals
Ella Rhodes at The Psychologist reports on the forthcoming launch of a ‘Learning Collaborative Network’, and Dr Amra Rao and Jeremy Clarke discuss the issues with the British Psychological Society President and President Elect.

Teaching Neuroscience in Prison
Two Cornell instructors brought their college course to the inmates at the Auburn Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison in upstate New York. They were accustomed to pre-med types; they found philosophers.

Loneliness and Inner Voices
The latest episode of BBC Radio 4’s Start the Week.

The Psychological Cost of Boring Buildings
Scientists are investigating the emotional toll of ugly architecture [see also].

Forget Mindfulness, Stop Trying to Find Yourself and Start Faking It
Why is the history of Chinese philosophy now the most popular course at Harvard? Top tips on how to become a better person according to Confucius and co.

Maker Of “Neuro” Drinks Agrees To Pay $500,000 In Fines and Restitution; Permanent Injunction Bars False and Misleading Health Claims 
A win in the ongoing battle against neurobunk [see also].

When Will We Be Able to Upload Our Consciousness Into a Computer?
Neuroscientist Daniel Bor gives his verdict.

Schools Are Finally Teaching What Kids Need to be Successful in Life
It’s not all about STEM

This Is How Our Minds May Actually Live On After Death
A psychologist explains how memory gives the dead a second life.
_________________________________
   
Post compiled by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of this week’s 10 best psychology and neuroscience links:

The Disengagement of Morality
In this extract from his new book published at The Psychologist, Stanford psychologist Albert Bandura examines the widespread moral compromises in the gun industry.

The Debunkers Of A Gay Marriage Study Just Re-bunked It, Sort Of
A fraudulent study that found a brief conversation with a gay person can reduce gay prejudice has just been sort of replicated, this time in the context of attitudes towards transgender people.

SJ Watson: Art, Identity and The World’s Most Famous Amnesiac
From Memento to Before I Go to Sleep, the case of Henry Molaison holds an enduring fascination for artists. SJ Watson, whose bestselling novel explored lost memory, asks Kerry Tribe about her video installation H.M. – and what we can learn from the world’s most famous amnesiac.

Winston Moseley, Who Killed Kitty Genovese, Dies in Prison at 81 [Read our post from 2007 on the truth about his crime]
Amazing details about the life of the murderer who inspired research into bystander apathy.

How Did Evil Evolve and Why Did It Persist?
‘Evil’ behaviours can be categorised into four basic groups – and they are far from being unique to our species.

The Measure of a Fog (video)
Why climate change is such a hard concept for the human mind to comprehend.

Critical Mental Health Has a Brain Problem
“To say mental health problems are ‘fundamentally’ social and psychological, immediately excludes people who either clearly have changes to the brain that even critical mental health advocates would accept as causal, or who feel that neurobiology is also a useful way of understanding their difficulties,” argues Vaughan Bell at Mind Hacks.

The Very Real Pain of Imaginary Illnesses
How do you tell a patient that their paralysis, blindness, or seizures are “all in the mind”? As the doctor Suzanne O’Sullivan explains to BBC Future, our thoughts and feelings can move the body in mysterious ways that are just as frightening as any physical illness.

What Can Our Craziest Dreams Teach Us?
“During sleep the mind can be a remarkable engine of problem solving and emotional processing.”

Mind Matters
Nature editorial: Mental illness is moving up the global agenda — but there is still much to do.
_________________________________
   
Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

Our free weekly email will keep you up-to-date with all the psychology research we digest: Sign up!

Link feast

Our editor’s pick of the 10 best psychology and neuroscience links from the last week or so

The Surprising Habits of Original Thinkers (video)
How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies “originals”: thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. Here’s his recent TED talk.

Lost for Words
A disease called primary progressive aphasia gradually robs people of their language skills while leaving their minds intact.

Watching Cat Videos at Work Could Make You More Productive
You can stop feeling so guilty.

The “Drugs vs Talking” Debate Doesn’t Help Us Understand Mental Health
Mental illness and how we treat it is back in the spotlight – but confusion and false distinctions create problems for both doctors and patients, argues Simon Wessely.

Runs In The Family
New findings about schizophrenia rekindle old questions about genes and identity.

So What Is A Gene?
Ken Richardson at The Psychologist with a different take following on from recent debates on the role of genetics in human psychology.

Make Recycled Goods Covetable
To reduce consumption and waste we must overcome our squeamishness about repurposing pre-owned possessions, says Bruce Hood.

Don’t Grade Schools on Grit
Angela Duckworth op-ed in the New York Times.

Why Are We Eternally Fascinated By Serial Killers?
Murderers like Charles Manson and Ted Bundy are a tiny threat to our society – yet our interest in them appears to be endless. Why?

Everybody Loves Dopamine
The Neurocritic cites two new recent studies that challenge popular theories about the function of the neurotransmitter.
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Post written by Christian Jarrett (@psych_writer) for the BPS Research Digest.

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