Category: Weekly links

Burnout And Bullshit: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Menopause involves the brain, not just the ovaries and more research is needed to understand these neurological effects. This work could help doctors improve treatment for the symptoms of menopause, and even aid in our understanding of diseases like Alzheimer’s, explains Kim Tingley at The New York Times.

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Athletes And Art: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

The Olympic Games begin in Tokyo later this month — but things are going to be very different from normal. How will the rules and restrictions surrounding the games affect athletes’ wellbeing? Jo Batey takes a look at The Conversation.

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Greying Hairs And Generational Amnesia: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

We all experience a phenomenon called “generational amnesia”, where we forget the ways in which previous generations shaped the world. And that makes it harder to solve global problems like climate change, writes Richard Fisher at BBC Future: if we think of the state of the world in our own youth as the “baseline”, then it’s harder to recognise long-term climate trends or declines in animal populations, for instance.

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Green Spaces And Phone Scams: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Have you noticed an increase in scam texts recently? I certainly have — and so has David Robson, writing at BBC Future.  These scammers often make it seem like we are facing some immediate threat like legal trouble or loss of money, capitalising on the fact that in this kind of situation we are less likely to think and act rationally. And the pandemic has provided just the right conditions for these scams to flourish, Robson writes.

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Cow Brains And Aphantasia: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

New work is providing fascinating insights into aphantasia, a condition where you are unable to see images with your mind’s eye. There even appears to be a flip side to the condition, hyperphantasia, where mental imagery is particularly powerful. Carl Zimmer examines the new findings at The New York Times (and see also our podcast on aphantasia from 2019).

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Magic Tricks And Media Literacy: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Sleep researchers often takes a “brain-centric” approach to their work, measuring sleep stages using EEG, for instance, or examining how sleep affects learning and memory. Yet rudimentary creatures also sleep — including the hydra, an aquatic organism which has a basic nervous system but no brain at all.  The findings suggest that our primitive ancestors slept before they even evolved brains, writes Veronique Greenwood at Wired

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Electric Fish And Children’s Play: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Electric fish seem to have mastered the art of the pause, writes Katherine J. Wu at The Atlantic. Brienomyrus brachyistius communicate by producing a series of electrical pulses. But researchers have found that the fish sometimes pause during their “conversations”, apparently as a signal that what they are about to communicate is important — similar to a “dramatic pause” in human speech.


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Moral Panics And Poor Sleep: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

A neural implant has allowed a paralysed individual to type by imagining writing letters. The implant of 200 electrodes in the premotor cortex picks up on the person’s intentions to perform the movements associated with writing a given letter, translating these into a character on a screen. The individual was able to type 90 characters per minute with minimal errors, reports John Timmer at Ars Technica.


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Flags And Phrenology: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

“Grumpy” dogs may be better learners than their more agreeable counterparts, reports James Gorman at The New York Times. Researchers found that grumpier canines were better at learning how to reach an object placed behind a fence by observing a stranger. But other scientists suggest that something more specific than “grumpiness” is responsible for the animals’ superior performance, such as increased aggression, reduced inhibition, or hyperactivity.

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Free Will And Facial Expressions: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

It’s not possible to reliably predict the emotions someone is experiencing based just on their facial expressions. And yet tech companies are trying to do just that. At The Atlantic, Kate Crawford explores some of these attempts — and the contested research on which they are based.


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