Category: Weekly links

Consciousness And Climate Change: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Recent research has found that mental health conditions like mood disorders and schizophrenia are associated with higher levels of inflammation in the body. Could this dysregulation of the immune system explain why people with these conditions are at risk of poorer Covid-19 outcomes? Brian Resnick explores the evidence at Vox.  

Continue reading “Consciousness And Climate Change: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Brain Stimulation And Body Language: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Research into the use of deep brain stimulation to treat depression has produced mixed results. But there may promise in a more personalised approach to treatment. At Science, Kelly Servick reports on studies using imaging and electrode recordings from individuals to figure out exactly which region to stimulate — and when — for the optimal response.

Continue reading “Brain Stimulation And Body Language: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Cheese Dreams and Bird Behaviour: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

There’s a widespread belief that eating cheese before bed can give you weird dreams. But there’s no evidence that this is true, writes Jessica Brown at BBC Future. The belief may have arisen from the fact that cheese is sometimes eaten as the last course of a meal, and eating late at night can disrupt our sleep.

Continue reading “Cheese Dreams and Bird Behaviour: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Making Excuses And Panic Buying: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

When you decline an invitation to do something with a friend, it’s better to blame a lack of money than a lack of time, according to researchers Grant Donnelly and Ashley Whillians at The Conversation. The pair found that participants felt less close to, and less trusting of, people who said they didn’t have time to come to a social occasion like a wedding or a dinner, compared to those who said they couldn’t afford to attend.

Continue reading “Making Excuses And Panic Buying: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Memes And Medals: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Olympic athletes have always been under intense pressure, but this year the pandemic has added to the challenges they face. At Wired, Amit Katwala explores the impact that competing at the Olympics has on athletes’ mental health.

Continue reading “Memes And Medals: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Burnout And Bullshit: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Menopause involves the brain, not just the ovaries and more research is needed to understand these neurological effects. This work could help doctors improve treatment for the symptoms of menopause, and even aid in our understanding of diseases like Alzheimer’s, explains Kim Tingley at The New York Times.

Continue reading “Burnout And Bullshit: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Athletes And Art: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

The Olympic Games begin in Tokyo later this month — but things are going to be very different from normal. How will the rules and restrictions surrounding the games affect athletes’ wellbeing? Jo Batey takes a look at The Conversation.

Continue reading “Athletes And Art: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Greying Hairs And Generational Amnesia: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

We all experience a phenomenon called “generational amnesia”, where we forget the ways in which previous generations shaped the world. And that makes it harder to solve global problems like climate change, writes Richard Fisher at BBC Future: if we think of the state of the world in our own youth as the “baseline”, then it’s harder to recognise long-term climate trends or declines in animal populations, for instance.

Continue reading “Greying Hairs And Generational Amnesia: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Green Spaces And Phone Scams: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

Have you noticed an increase in scam texts recently? I certainly have — and so has David Robson, writing at BBC Future.  These scammers often make it seem like we are facing some immediate threat like legal trouble or loss of money, capitalising on the fact that in this kind of situation we are less likely to think and act rationally. And the pandemic has provided just the right conditions for these scams to flourish, Robson writes.

Continue reading “Green Spaces And Phone Scams: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”

Cow Brains And Aphantasia: The Week’s Best Psychology Links

Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web

New work is providing fascinating insights into aphantasia, a condition where you are unable to see images with your mind’s eye. There even appears to be a flip side to the condition, hyperphantasia, where mental imagery is particularly powerful. Carl Zimmer examines the new findings at The New York Times (and see also our podcast on aphantasia from 2019).

Continue reading “Cow Brains And Aphantasia: The Week’s Best Psychology Links”